Friday, April 29, 2016

heART beats from other blogs!



Snap out of it, Jean! There's beading to be done!
Jean reviews Quick & Easy Stitched Jewelry, 20+ Projects to Make, by Cathy Jakicic--it's wonderful!

Wire Headpins How-To
Learn how to make these easy wire headpins that have three wire loops on the end.

Make Bulky Yarn Out of Medium Weight Yarn
Using worsted weight yarn and a spool knitter, you can make bulky yarn that you can then knit with. A great stash buster!

Dress Card for Mother's Day
If you have or know a model mom who does her very best for her kids and sets an example you admire, tell her with a "priceless" dress card like this.


Thursday, April 28, 2016

Giveaway on EBEG blog


The Etsy Bead Embroidery Guild is active again, and they are kicking off the season with a giveaway!  Visit the link above and learn about the guild and the earrings that are the prize.

Monday, April 25, 2016

How to stitch a Dutch spiral

Earrings made with Dutch spiral

The Dutch spiral is not so much a stitch as it is a series of stitches.  A combination of peyote and netting, the Dutch spiral is a soft, stretchy tube with beautiful drape.  Choose your thread color carefully and hold it firmly while working to help keep up the tension.

There are two parts to the spiral: the peyote section is sometimes collectively called the core beads, and the netting section is created by a loose length of seed beads and accent beads.  I suggest using differently shaped or colored beads for the core beads and the netting, at least until you're familiar with the sequence.  I really like Delicas for the way they fit together to make a nice tighter core section, and regular donut-shaped seed beads for the netting.

There are many different ways to do the Dutch spiral, but having tried quite a few of them, here is my take on the easiest way to get started.  Once you've mastered it, you can increase and decrease the netting portion to make pretty undulating shapes like in the earrings I made, shown above.

A simple Dutch spiral tube:



Row 1: Pick up a size 8/0 seed bead (8) and loop the thread through it again to form a stop bead, leaving a tail of at least 6-8".  Pick up 6 Delicas (D) and 3 size 11/0 seed beads (SB).  Stitch through the 8 to form a loop.



Row 2: Pick up an 8 and stitch through the 2nd D.  Pick up 1D and stitch through the 4th D.  Pick up 1D and stitch through the 6th D  Pick up 1D and 3SB, and stitch through the 8 added in this row.  Make sure these netting beads sit on top of the netting beads from Row 1.



Row 3: *Pick up an 8 and peyote stitch through the 1st raised D.  Pick up 1 D and peyote stitch through the 2nd raised D.  Pick up 1D and peyote stitch through the D added in the netting stitch of Row 2.*  Pick up 1D and 3SB, and stitch through the 8 added in this row.  Continue to make sure each new netting stitch sits on top of the netting stitch of the previous row.



Row 4 and following: Repeat *the peyote section* of Row 3.  The netting stitch for each new row can be continued like Row 3 for a symmetrical rope, or it can be altered, making it longer with more seed beads or additional embellishments.

Additional Tips:
Choose a thread color that won't stand out.  You can see in my sample that the white thread is quite visible in between some of the beads.  And my tension is fairly firm!  Hold onto the tail to help control tension.

To keep track of your beads, add the same type of bead you have just exited.

There is no peyote "step up".  Simply stitch through the 8/0 added earlier in the row and begin your next row.  Use the 8/0's to count the number of rows!

You will see the spiral begin to form by Row 5 or 6.

Weave your thread tails back into the beadwork when you are done.  Don't forget to undo the loop from the first stop bead!


Here are other spiral forms that I've featured over the years:
The simple spiral
Cellini spiral
The spiral square stitch
Indespiral by Aleta Ford Baker
Twisted ladder


Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Friday, April 22, 2016

heART beats from other blogs!



Snap out of it, Jean! There's beading to be done!
Jean reviews Jeweler's Enameling Workshop Techniques and Projects for Making Enameled Jewelry by Pauline Warg. Get the full basics on this wonderful technique and make something pretty!

Free Cat Trio Pattern
Like cats? Connie's got a free pattern that will be perfect for you!

'Ya Can't Please Everyone, So Ya Got to Please Yourself'
Don't compare your efforts with those of accomplished crafters and think you're not good enough. If you give up, you'll never get better. This is the voice of experience speaking.

Jewelry Creations Using Bead Box Bargain April 2016
I had a viewer ask me, "What do I make with the Bead Box Bargain shipment...well, here is what I made with the April 2016 goodies.

Crochet Designing
If you have the right tools and a little crochet knowledge, you can design your own crocheted afghan pretty easily.

Upcycled Recycling Box
Do you recycle in the bathroom? Many people don't, and it's often because there's no go place to put recyclables there. Here's an easy upcycled box to hold items for recycling in the bathroom or anywhere else.


Thursday, April 21, 2016

Copper Canyon found a new home!

Copper Canyon: copper, turquoise, and coral

SOLD

Hammered copper links form the focal points for this delicate but arresting necklace. Coral and turquoise, in both round bead and chip form, bring out the burnished beauty of the metal. Copper Canyon adjusts from 17 to 20 inches. The dangling beads give this fun necklace lots of movement.

Yay for Mary!


Congratulations to Mary Redman, who won a copy of Quick & Easy Stitched Jewelry!!

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Monday, April 18, 2016

Another reclaimed bangle bracelet


Last week I showed you a fun and easy way to give new life to a boring bangle bracelet.  Today, I want to show you an alternative way to wrap it, which is especially helpful if you don't have enough cup chain, or if you want to add different beads to the mix!

Here's what you'll need:

Plastic bangle bracelet
6-8" cup chain, 5mm
Assorted beads, any material
9' galvanized steel wire, 24 g
Wire cutters
Chain nose pliers
Measuring tape


1. Cut short lengths of cup chain and choose the beads you want to use.




2. Leave a short tail of wire to start, as shown in the tutorial last week, and wrap the wire three times to get started and three times between each "stone".  Wrap twice after the cup chain and pick up some beads with the wire.  Wrap backwards between each bead, as shown, and then cross wire forwards to start the next wrap.  



3. Wrap over the tail and tuck the other end underneath a wire as best you can.  Squeeze gently with chain nose pliers to secure.


Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Friday, April 15, 2016

heART beats from other blogs!



Snap out of it, Jean! There's beading to be done!
Jean reviews the book: More Lovely Knitted Lace Contemporary Patterns in Geometric Shapes by Brooke Nico. So pretty!

Comfy Quilt Pattern
The free Comfy Quilt pattern was one of the first freebies Connie added to the site. Check it out and be sure to look for all the other free patterns she offers.

Watercolor Passion Flower Cards
Painting something several times teaches you a lot about the subject. How to make it a bit quicker with templates.

Embellish a Tote Bag with Circles
Cover up the logo on a cloth bag (or a crafty mistake) by cutting out fabric shapes and applying them to the bag. Easy!

April's Bargain Beads!
Tammy un-bags her April shipment of bargain beads.

The Writing and Art of Andrew Thornton
Take a look at what arrived in Andrew's mailbox! An advance copy of Series 2400 of Beads, Baubles and Jewels! So exciting!


Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Book review and giveaway: Quick & Easy Stitched Jewelry


There are many many beginner books out there, and there are even lots that have easy and attractive projects to create.  Quick & Easy Stitched Jewelry, written by Cathy Jakicic and published by Kalmbach, has a bit of a bonus feature though.  Cathy has generously designated all of the projects in this book as royalty-free.  Not only can you make them for yourself or as gifts for others, but she encourages you to sell them if you wish.

Rather than concentrating on just one stitch, this collection gives you ideas for many...peyote, square, ladder, herringbone, RAW, and bead embroidery.  Plus, there are instructions for the basic wirework you will need for constructing the finished pieces.

GIVEAWAY ALERT!!! 

Would you like a heaping handful of new projects this Spring?  Here's what you need to do...please read this carefully. Leave me a comment here and include your email address. If I don't see your email address, I will not contact you. No contact, no win, and I simply have to go on to the next person. You are welcome to spell it out if you'd prefer, for example, beadingarts at gmail dot com. If you tweet or post on Facebook or other social spots about the contest, you can leave a second comment and be entered twice! Deadline: April 20, 2016

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Turquoise Seas - for sale

Silver, copper, turquoise-colored beads, probably dyed howlite
$55

The next piece up for grabs is Turquoise Seas.  I made this piece in 2010, and it's another necklace that just sits on my shelf and mopes for a good home.  


The large central bead in this piece is made from bead-woven silver and copper beads, using a spiraling peyote stitch technique. It is approximately 2-1/2 inches long, and is surrounded by copper, silver, and turquoise-colored stones in the rest of the necklace strand. The rest is put together using simple stringing and wire work techniques.  Length adjusts from 18 to 21 inches.

Monday, April 11, 2016

New life to a boring bangle bracelet



I have bags and bags full of cast off jewelry from flea markets, yard sales, and generous friends.  Recently, I was looking at a bag full of plastic bangles (the hard plastic kind), and I thought about using cup chain on it in a similar way to the Shamballa bracelets I was making last year.

Super easy, super quick, super cute!  And all you need is the following:

Plastic bangle bracelet
9-10" cup chain, 5mm
10' galvanized steel wire, 24 g

Wire cutters
Chain nose pliers
Measuring tape




1. Leave a short tail as shown and wrap three times between each "stone".



2. Wrap over the tail and tuck the other end underneath a wire as best you can.  Squeeze gently with chain nose pliers to secure.



Another reclaimed bangle bracelet

Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Friday, April 08, 2016

heART beats from other blogs!



Free Journey Proverb Free Pattern
Graduation season will be here before we know it. Connie's added a super simple free chart that will be great for making up in to graduation cards. It is also suitable for a friend who is moving or making a job change.

Snap out of it, Jean! There's beading to be done!
Jean reviews Play with Chain Mail: 4 Weaves = 20+ Jewelry Designs by Theresa D. Abelew. Lots of fun!

Charms!
Charms make for a great way to start jewelry designing just for the fun of it.

What Inspires Me When Making Jewelry
Having a hard time coming up with beading ideas? Terry Jeanette of the Tappingflamingo gives you some ideas...

Interested in a great creative learning opportunity this summer?
Allegory Gallery is pleased to present: Creative Camp! This weekend intensive features workshops taught by Eva Sherman, Heather Powers, and Cynthia Thornton!

Embossed Aluminum Postcard Art
Embossed aluminum postcard art is made with inexpensive aluminum foil tape stuck onto scraps of card stock. Four examples using different techniques.

Draw a Map of Your Daily Route
Look at your routine in a new way by drawing a map of your route to work or school.



Wednesday, April 06, 2016

Book review: Play With Chain Mail


I never thought about it this way before, but Theresa Abelew points out that chain maille is the ultimate recyclable project.  If you don't like what you get, take it apart and try again...no waste!

If you have been daunted by the dizzying array of jump ring sizes (inner diameter?  outer diameter?  what???) and weave patterns, then you might be ready for Theresa's new book Play With Chain Mail, published by Kalmbach.  The author concentrates on presenting four weaves in their basic formation, followed by jewelry projects which will help you practice each.  The patterns covered are rosette or mobius, box chain and Byzantine, European 4-in-1, and Helm chain.  Each section starts with the classic chain and then moves onward to more interesting applications.

One problem with working on chain maille is that so many different ring sizes can be required.  Theresa is mindful of that, and has given you a chart in the back that you can quickly check to see which projects use the same sizes.  She has also tried to limit the sizes as much as possible so that you can be sure there will be other projects to use up your leftovers!

All the basics are covered, as in all Kalmbach books.  Couple this with the chart, the excellent instructions, and the organization of the book, and you've got yourself a really good beginner's book here.

Monday, April 04, 2016

Yay for Heather!


Congratulations to Heather Martin, who won a copy of Origami Jewelry Motifs!!

Why did it take so long to post a winner?  Because the first couple of people I tried to contact never wrote back.  Am I in your spam folder or did you just lose interest?  Oh well...yay for Heather!

Faux patchwork quilt block - part two

Last week, I showed you the set-up for making a whole cloth crazy quilt block with no patchwork, only faux seams.  Today, I want to share with you the embellishments that I chose, plus how I finished off the block.

My original plan was to add beads all around the edge of the block with no frame, but as I started, it just looked so barren.  It really really needed a frame, so I re-worked my plan.

But first, the fun stuff!







7. Embroidery, add beads and buttons, etc.



8. Cut a piece of stiff but thin interfacing and a piece of batting larger than the finished block will be.  Wrap interfacing with the backing fabric, mitering the corners.



9. Wrap the batting with the finished block, mitering the corners.  Pin them together and blind stitch the block to the backing.



Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Friday, April 01, 2016

heART beats from other blogs!



Snap out of it, Jean! There's beading to be done!
Jean reviews the delicious, versatile recipe book, Change Your Sauce, Change Your Life ~Easy Plant Based Sauces to Blend, Whisk, and Shake~ from Positively Vegan by Kim Miles--it's marvelous!

Diamond Seventeen
Connie's added the next section of her free SAL. There's still time to get in on it if you haven't started yet!

Online Learning at CreativeLive
Eileen is a big fan of CreativeLive, especially since she received a free class: Watercolor 101 with Molly Murrah. Read how you could too. Choose classes in photography, crafts, art, design, business & more.

Bead Unboxing
March means lots of green beads, which is the case with this unboxing video showing the March shipment of bargain beads.


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