Monday, November 28, 2016

Amethyst tree necklace tutorial - part two


Last week, I showed you how I decided to trap this unusually shaped slab in a wire cage in order to add it to a bead embroidered necklace.  Starting where we left off...



8. I trimmed the foundation fabric close to the outside edge of stack stitched beads, and removed the guide thread.



9. Since this is a heavy piece, I decided to add another piece of interfacing (see step 3), this time to the entire piece.  I chose Lutradur, because it is extremely strong even though it is quite thin.



10. After cutting a backing piece of fabric, I used edging brick stitch to cover the raw edges all the way around.



11. Around the sides and the top, I added a simple stack stitch to each edging bead.



12. Near the bottom, I added heavier beads and stitched the stacks longer so that they became fringe.



13. I tested the piece for balance and chose two spots on the sides near the top where I wanted the necklace strands to attach.  At those points, I stitched two square stitch bails.



14.  Here is the finished centerpiece.


Next week, please join me for Part Three - the straps, and check out Part One - the design if you missed it!

Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Friday, November 25, 2016

heART beats from other blogs!



3D Goofy Turkey Place Cards
Put smiles on guests' faces this Thanksgiving as they search for the goofy turkey place cards clutching guest names in the beaks. How-to and downloads.

Pattern Mix & Match Card: Eye-catching & Easy Peasy
If you enjoy mixing and matching patterns in your decor or art, then you'll love making this pattern mix and match card!



Monday, November 21, 2016

Amethyst tree necklace tutorial - part one


Sometimes you have to get more than just a little bit creative when adding a stone or other item to a piece of bead embroidery.  I have used wire wrapping many times to help secure a cabochon or donut (like in Orinoco Flow, below).


The wire gives you more places to catch a thread and stitch the odd-shaped item down. But this slab of amethyst crystals had me stumped for awhile.  Until I decided to create a cage for it that didn't actually wrap around it!

I'm going to share many of my steps with you over the next few weeks.  If you are a beginner to bead embroidery, please help yourself to a download of the first chapter of Every Bead Has a Story.  You will find step-by-step instructions for putting together a bead embroidered piece, including back stitch, edging brick stitch, stack stitch, all the materials and tools, etc.

I won't be giving you materials lists or exact measurements and details like that, because I've shared them many many times, including in the chapter listed above.  Instead, I'll be concentrating on design decisions and some additional tips and tricks that made the construction of this piece easier than it looks.  Let's go!



1. Using a heavy gauge wire, I made a circle that would encompass the amethyst slab and added a fine wire design that I twisted together.  I left enough slack to account for the depth of the slab.



2. I stitched the wire cage down to the foundation fabric with a piece of interfacing underneath, which you'll see in the next image.  I added several rows of seed beads around the cage in back stitch.



3. Here is the back with the interfacing trimmed close to the rows of back stitch.  I drew the approximate shape that I wanted for the necklace on the back of the foundation fabric.  I don't always (or even usually) do this.



4. Using the drawn shape as a guide, I stitched around the outer border of my desired shape.



5. Here is the piece with a first round of stack stitch beads applied.  Note that the ones on top are generally smaller than the ones on the bottom.  Working in rounds like this helps to keep your beadwork balanced, by size, color, shape, and texture.



6. Here is the piece with all the stack stitches finished, and...



7. ...here is the back so you can see the stitching pattern.


Next week, please join me for Part Two - the edging, and then for Part Three - the straps the following week!


Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, November 14, 2016

Amethyst tree necklace

Here's what I just finished working on...a tutorial is coming soon!




Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. 

Friday, November 11, 2016

heART beats from other blogs!



Dream Create Inspire — Making Art Happen
Eileen made a fun piece of postcard art from start to finish this week! If you sometimes get stuck and have trouble completing projects, she has a tip for you.

Snap out of it, jean! There's beading to be done!
Jean reviews the beautiful book by Christina Anton, Creative Leather Jewelry



Wednesday, November 09, 2016

Mixed media art books


Just trying to catch up here today!  I've posted quite a number of reviews of mixed media art books over on Mixed Media Artist since the last time I shared a comprehensive list of them here on Beading Arts.  That was back in April...wow!

In chronological order, here's what's been posted since:

Favorite Fabric Bowls, Boxes and Vases

Creative Strength Training

Acrylic Expressions

Double Vision Quilts

Art Quilt Collage

Pigments of Your Imagination, 2nd edition

Making Art from Maps

Painted Paper Art Workshop

Artful Improv

Fabricadabra




Monday, November 07, 2016

Bead embroidered rhodochrosite pendant


This will be the last little bead embroidery pendant for a short while, because I finally started working on a BIG one!  This stone is rhodochrosite, and like the others from the past few weeks, it's been sitting in my bin of crazy-beautiful stones for too long.  It's a small stone, and so the beads are mostly size 15/0s with a final row of size 11/0s.  


It's an odd shade of pink, and I felt that if I wasn't careful, it could end up looking like pepto bismol.  The stone has some crystalline "flaws" in it, so it wasn't terribly expensive; therefore, I felt pretty free to experiment with the bead colors.  The background of the stone has a peachy cast, but the swirling foreground is a cool pink, so I was a bit ambivalent about bead colors.  In retrospect, I think the deeper red color should have been cooler, but when you are looking at it straight on, the red doesn't show quite as much as in the angle of my photos...plus, the beads are REALLY tiny!



I feel like I have repeated similar instructions too frequently lately to write them all out again.  You can check the recent Leopard Skin Jasper pendant tutorial for a basic outline of the steps and match them up with the images shown here.




Or if you haven't already done this, you can download my free ebook chapter.  Step-by-step instructions for putting together a bead embroidered piece, including back stitch, edging brick stitch, and stack stitch can be found in the free first chapter of Every Bead Has a Story.  Chapter two has instructions for stitching a peyote stitch bezel, and Chapter three teaches the square stitch bail.




One thing I'll point out here is that I used two different colors of Nymo thread for this piece.  As you can see above, I switched from white (used for most of it) to black just for the row of edging brick stitch.  Since the stitches would be visible at the edges, I didn't want to use white.


Copyright 2016 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Friday, November 04, 2016

heART beats from other blogs!



Coloring Book Giveaway
Find out how to enter to win the Bountiful Wonders coloring book. It will be a perfect companion to your families Thanksgiving activities.


Embossing Tools: Machines and Folders
Embossing tools add lovely textures to many craft materials from cardstock to metal. Marion asked what embossing tools Eileen used in some holiday cards. Read what you need to get started embossing.



Wednesday, November 02, 2016

Book review: The Embroidery Book


A new volume by C+T Publishing, and it is a beauty!! The Embroidery Book, by Christen Brown, has the subtitle, Visual resource of color and design, and that's what makes it a treat far different from many embroidery guides.  The guide comes first so that you can figure out immediately what stitches you want to learn.  There are 149 stitches covered, with step-by-step instructions and so many lush lush lush examples that you will just be aching to expand your repertoire!

I would say that this book would be best for those who want to take the stitches that you know, learn more, and design projects for yourself.  It is not an exhaustive guide, but it has lovely sections that cover a brief history, materials and tools, color theory, design basics, specific design compositions and color schemes that work, and different embroidery applications (including straight seam, crazy quilt, applique, trims, borders, etc).

   

If you do not have a good embroidery reference work, this may be exactly what you've been looking for!
Related Posts with Thumbnails