Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Pantone colors, beads, and jewelry on Pinterest

 

I am deeply in love with several of the colors that Pantone has identified for Fall 2017, including Grenadine, Shaded Spruce, and Marina.  In fact, I am putting together a Pinterest board to gather together color inspiration, beads, and jewelry (including tutorials) for those colors and more.

You might recognize these pairs:
 
 




 
 Aegean Seas


Here's one that's coming next week...





















Hit me up on Pinterest if you'd like to connect that way!





Copyright 2017 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, September 25, 2017

Stitch a clock motif for your bead embroidery - part one

 

In playing around with the beads that I received from Jesse James Beads, I figured out another fun motif that you can stitch to enhance your bead embroidery.

The motif is stitched with a combination of peyote and herringbone stitches, and then is stitched down to a foundation fabric.  In my e-book Bored By Back Stitch, I teach you how to create twelve different bead embroidery motifs, using nine different beadweaving stitches, so maybe you can think of this one as the baker's dozen supplement!


Materials

Jesse James focal bead
Tribal Stripes Inspiration bead mix - choose one of the 15mm beads for the focal.  Others will be used in your expanded bead embroidery design


Seed Beads
Size 8/0:
Color-lined pink
Transparent frosted root beer

Size 6/0:
Color-lined pink

Size 11/0:
Fuchsia matte


Opaque metallic fuchsia squares

Tools

Beading needles
Scissors
Nymo beading thread, black, size O
Foundation fabric, like ultra-suede
Double sided tape


 

1. Stitch back and forth through the focal bead to add two size 8/0 beads at each end.  Add both at the same time.  Leave about a 6" tail.


 

2.  String 10 size 8/0 beads on each side to give you 24 beads altogether.  Run the thread through all the beads a second time to tighten.  You can use a different number of beads if you want, as long as there are the same number on each side.  But if you want a clock pattern, there must be 24 beads to start.


 

3. Using peyote stitch, add size 6/0 beads in the same color around the ring and step up at the end.  You will have 12 size 6/0 beads in this row.



4. Create the herringbone base in this row by adding two size 11/0 beads on each 6/0 from the last row.  Stitch down through the next 8/0 from the first row and up through the next 6/0 to add the next stitch.  Repeat around, and step up through the first two size 11/0s added.



5. For the second herringbone row, add two more size 11/0s and stitch back through the pink size 6/0.  Add a root beer colored 6/0 between each stitch, stitch through the next pink size 6/0, and repeat adding herringbone stitches and more size 6/0s around.  Step up through the first herringbone stitch added this row.



6.  Add a third herringbone stitch.  Stitch down through the herringbone stack, through the pink size 6/0 beneath them, and back up through the other side of the herringbone stack to exit back at the top.



7.  Add a cube bead and a single size 11/0 as a stopper bead.  Stitch back down the left side of the herringbone stack, through three size 6/0s, and up through the right side of the next stack to repeat around.



8. Cut a small hole in a piece of foundation fabric to allow your focal bead to sink into it slightly.  Use the active weaving thread and the tail to stitch the piece down.  I started by stitching each brown size 6/0 down, and then moved out to the stopper beads and stitched them down.  End your threads on the back.

I'm hoping to have this finished by next week (Part two)so that I can show you some additional embellishment ideas and show you how to finish the piece off as a pendant.  Till then!

 


This post contains affiliate links: Jesse James Beads and Beadaholique.  I received the beads from Jesse James Beads free of charge in order to create several projects at no cost for you. 

Copyright 2017 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Monday, September 18, 2017

A bead stitch combination to try - right-angle peyote

 

In the current issue of Bead&Button (October 2017), there is a stitch workshop article by Antonio Calles on a technique he calls right-angle peyote, because it combines the two stitches into a clever component that can be linked together to form all sorts of pretty designs.

You can find a couple of his projects and blank charts online (you must be a subscriber).  The basic component is easy to stitch, especially if you're familiar with both RAW and peyote.  If they are new to you, make sure you pick up a copy of B&B to get the instructions for the component!  To figure out the component and stitch together two of them as shown above took me less than 5 minutes.  It would have been less, but I changed my mind about one of the colors!

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Book giveaway: The Art of Quilling Paper Jewelry


Last week, I shared my review of Ann Martin's new book, The Art of Quilling Paper Jewelry.  Well, today I am delighted to be able to offer up a copy for giveaway! Let me tantalize you with some images from the book that Ann shared with me...can you even believe they are made from paper??





 

GIVEAWAY ALERT!!! 

Would you like a great book full of new projects?  Here's what you need to do...please read this carefully. Leave me a comment here and include your email address. If I don't see your email address, I will not contact you. No contact, no win, and I simply have to go on to the next person. You are welcome to spell it out if you'd prefer, for example, beadingarts at gmail dot com. If you tweet or post on Facebook or other social spots about the contest, you can leave a second comment and be entered twice! Deadline: September 21, 2016

 

Monday, September 11, 2017

Fierce - a Tribal Stripes bead embroidery tutorial


One of the best things about working with black and white beads in the new Jesse James Beads Tribal Stripes collection is that it gives you unlimited potential for mixing in other colors.  The Pantone color called Pink Yarrow is so hot right now, and I like it anyway, so that's the direction I went in stitching up this new pendant that I call Fierce!


Materials + Tools


Jesse James Beads
Tribal Stripes inspiration bead mix
Tribal Stripes mini bead mix

Seed Beads
Size 11/0:
Black matte
Fuchsia matte
White
Fuchsia Delicas

Size 8/0:
Color-lined hot pink

Size 15/0:
Black

Tools
Beading needles
Scissors
Nymo beading thread, black, size O
Foundation fabric, like ultra-suede
Double sided tape



1. Use a small piece of double sided tape to position your focal bead and stitch it down.

2. Stitch a row of back stitch around the bead with size 11/0 seed beads.  Keep an even number of beads on each side, not counting the corners.  Run your thread through all the stitches a second time to cinch them up, and tack down on the back of the foundation fabric.  Come up so that you have passed through a corner bead and one additional row bead.  Begin peyote stitch down to the next corner.


 

3. When you reach the next corner bead, skip it and add two seed beads over top of it.  Repeat around, adding two beads at each corner.  In the following rows, these two beads will be the base for a herringbone stitch, which will hug the corner.  I added several more rows to accommodate the depth of my bead, and in the final row I switched to size 15/0 seed beads, using size 11/0s only on the corners.  For the final row, I added a single bead at the top of the herringbone stitches just to finish them off.



4. Continue to add rows of back stitch working outward from the bezel in color combinations that please you.  Add some small focal beads for variety.




5. Add a couple more rows of back stitch, and cut out your pendant, leaving about 1/8 inch of foundation fabric.  Use double sided tape to attach backing fabric, and cut it even with the top.



6. Stitch around the outside through both pieces of fabric using edging brick stitch.


 

7. Add stack stitches to each edging stitch.





8. Add a square stitch bail to the back.  I usually use eleven rows with size 11/0 seed beads.


 


If you need more details for any of the instructions, step-by-step instructions for putting together a bead embroidered piece, including back stitch, edging brick stitch, and stack stitch can be found in the free first chapter of Every Bead Has a Story.  Chapter two has instructions for stitching a peyote stitch bezel, and Chapter three teaches the square stitch bail.

This post contains affiliate links: Jesse James Beads and Beadaholique.  I received the beads from Jesse James Beads free of charge in order to create several projects at no cost for you.  

Copyright 2017 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

Wednesday, September 06, 2017

Book review: The Art of Quilling Paper Jewelry



Ann Martin has written a new book, published by Interweave, on the beautiful art of quilling.  Her twist is to apply this ancient art form to wearables!  The Art of Quilling Paper Jewelry is a marvelous introduction to quilling techniques, and it might just become your next obsession!  I'm going to be doing a giveaway with this book very soon, so stay tuned!!

Ann starts with the history of quilling, and introduces us to the wide variety of pre-cut strips with metallic edging.  She also shows you how to make your own, if you want to try it out before buying supplies, or if you're a purist about materials!  Besides the quilling strips, a few very basic tools are needed, most of which you probably already own.  The needle tool or slotted tool may be the only things you don't have, but you can substitute plain wire to try it out before buying a tool.  Otherwise, you will need some dowels, tweezers, scissors, a ruler, pins, glue, and basic jewelry-making tools.


The basic techniques are easy to learn, though it takes practice and patience to master them.  Isn't that true of all the best art?  Simple, but not easy.  You will learn how to roll the strips properly, how to know the correct length for the strips, how to create a longer or thicker strip, how to glue them properly, how to create basic coils and scrolls, and then finally how to make all the basic shapes that will be used in the following projects.  The really neat thing is how much variety you can achieve in looks with very simple internal shapes.



The largest section of the book is the projects, 20 in all.  My very favorite is actually the one shown on the cover, although there are lots of lovely earrings and pendants to choose from.  And it doesn't take long before you start to see how you could change the designs to suit yourself...

You've been warned!  This looks like a LOT of fun :-)

Monday, September 04, 2017

Tribal Stripes bead embroidered pendant - a tutorial


I received a wonderful package of beads recently from Jesse James Beads, all from their new Tribal Stripes line.  It's part of their Afrika Afrika collection, new for late summer/fall.  Why did they send them to me?  So I could make some projects that you might enjoy doing!


Materials + Tools

Jesse James Beads
Tribal Stripes inspiration bead mix
Tribal Stripes mini bead mix

Seed beads, size 11/0
Black
Black matte
White
Red

Seed beads, size 15/0
Black

Tools
Beading needles
Scissors
Nymo beading thread, black, size O
Foundation fabric, like ultra-suede
Double sided tape


1. Use a small piece of double sided tape to position your focal bead.  Stitch it down and surround it closely with back stitched matte black size 11/0 seed beads to stabilize it.



2. Continue to add rows of back stitch in color combinations that please you.  A few rows out, add some smaller focal beads for variety.



3. Add a couple more rows of back stitch, and cut out your pendant, leaving about 1/8 inch of foundation fabric.  Use double sided tape to attach backing fabric, and cut it even with the top.


4. Stitch around the outside through both pieces of fabric using edging brick stitch.  Add stack stitches to each edging stitch, making the ones near the bottom more elaborate if you'd like.  I also added a dangling bead from the Tribal Stripes collection.


5. Add a square stitch bail to the back.  I usually use eleven rows with size 11/0 seed beads.


If you need more details for any of the instructions, step-by-step instructions for putting together a bead embroidered piece, including back stitch, edging brick stitch, and stack stitch can be found in the free first chapter of Every Bead Has a Story.  Chapter two has instructions for stitching a peyote stitch bezel, and Chapter three teaches the square stitch bail.


This post contains affiliate links: Jesse James Beads and Beadaholique.  I received the beads from Jesse James Beads free of charge in order to create several projects at no cost for you.  
Copyright 2017 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.
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