Monday, June 29, 2015

Shamballa ribbon bracelet

How does your light shine?
In the halls of Shambala

Always popular for summertime, Shamballa-style bracelets have become year-round accessories for many people.  And that's great, because they are SO EASY to make!  I'm going to show you a version that's a little bit different, because frankly, you can get the instructions for the "normal" ones any-old-where.

Materials and Tools
36" Round or ribbon-style suede cord, 3mm
4 1/2" (stretched out) cup chain, 5mm
72" + 20" Champagne sheer Asiana ribbon, 1/4"

Clear glue
Clip board
Tape measure
Wire cutters
Scissors
Tapestry needle
Chain nose pliers



1. Fold your cord in half and clip the fold to the top of your clip board.




2. Fold the long length of ribbon in half and tie a macrame-style square knot around your two cords, about 5 inches down from the top.




3. Complete about 5 macrame square knots in total (covering about 1" of the cords), and squish the knots down to about 1/2".




4. Begin the next square knot, but slip the first rhinestone in your length of cup chain under the first pass of the ribbon.  Pull it snug and complete the second half of the knot between the first and second stone.




5. Add a complete square knot in between each stone.  Add another 5 square knots below the cup chain, but do not squish them together yet.




6. Using the tapestry needle, thread the ribbon ends through each of the last 5 knots on the back of the bracelet.  Add a dot of glue to each and clip the ends off once dry.  Squish the knots to about 1/2".




7. Taking the shorter length of ribbon, cross the cord ends as shown, and tie a square knot around all four cords.




8. Make 5 or more square knots and finish the ends as in step 6.  Do not make these knots too tight, since you need the cords to be able to slide.  Knot and clip the ends of the cords.  Most people choose to leave theirs a little longer than I did, but it is entirely up to you.




9. Finished!  Pretty, huh?



This post is sponsored by Offray, from whom I have received some of the products in order to create this project for you.
Copyright 2015 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

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Friday, June 26, 2015

heART beats from other blogs!



WIP Update and Free Pattern
Connie's posted an update on her latest WIP (work in progress) and she's also posted a new free pattern for you to stitch and enjoy.

DIY Lanyard Ideas
Have you thought about making your own lanyard for work or trips? Here are some ideas, including a lanyard that can be worn as a bracelet or a long or short necklace.

Mixed Media Canvas: A Flower Blooms
Eileen took a class taught by artist Stephenie Hamen and had a lot of messy fun!

Art Bead Scene
Meet the Art Bead Artists who have responded to our monthly challenge!


Fire Mountain Gems and Beads


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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Recent publications: June 2015



Jewelry Making 1-2-3: 45+ Simple Projects by Karin Van Voorhees

Soldered Alchemy: 24 Jewelry Projects Using New Soft-Solder Techniques by Laura Beth Love



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Monday, June 22, 2015

Right angle weave earrings


I've found another way to recharge my batteries when I'm in between major projects!  Last week, I told you about just letting my fingers work on some weaving without having a real goal in mind, which resulted in a tube of Cellini spiral.  Well, I still didn't have a plan, so I went looking for another quick and easy little something-or-other to make.

I settled on a necklace that I made several years ago, but decided to use the pattern to make some earrings.  No, they don't match the original necklace, but they will go with a lot of things I'm currently wearing.  The instructions can be found here at the Beaded Lily Necklace tutorial.




I made three right angle weave units, as explained in the tutorial, topping them with Swarovski crystal chaton montees (# 18ss).  The ear wires I made are longer than usual: I used 3 inch lengths of wire instead of my customary 2 to 2 1/2, simply because my hair is longer now, and I like a bit more length.  To make the ear wires, turn a small loop at the bottom, and use a pen to loop both wires up and over.  Do them both at the same time and you'll keep them identical.  Use chain nose or flat nose pliers to turn the ends up, clip them off even, and file them smooth.

Copyright 2015 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

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Friday, June 19, 2015

heART beats from other blogs!



Welcome Sampler Cross Stitch Pattern
Connie's added a new free pattern that is easy to adapt to your own personal taste. It would make a great gift when framed or finished as a flat-fold.

Art Bead Scene
Read all about Erin's experiences learning with the masters at Bead and Button!

Crepe Paper Magnolias
Welcome summer with a bouquet of hand made crepe paper magnolias.

Yummy Silk Blend Yarn
The Crafty Princess reviews Cascade Heritage Silk Paint yarn in this short video.


Fire Mountain Gems and Beads


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Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Book review: Jewelry Making 1-2-3



Are you a beginner?  Are you sick of beginner projects that all look alike?  You are definitely gonna want this book, or you're gonna want to get it for someone you love who is a beginner.  Karin Van Voorhees has designed the projects and written Jewelry Making 1-2-3, and I am so so thankful that there is a designer who specializes in beautiful and interesting projects that will allow you to practice the basics.  Here we go...

In part one, Karin teaches six basic skills, each followed by projects that will help you practice the skills in a FUN and beautiful way.  She covers jump rings, plain loops, wrapped loops, top-drilled loops, crimps, and knots.  There are no sources given for the materials used, but all items are commonly available through online jewelry making catalogs and at stores such as Michaels.

In parts two and three, Karin covers more design-oriented skills, such as using spacers and beadcaps, creating multistrand pieces, choosing between symmetry and asymmetry, designing with brights and neutrals, and swapping out different findings (like clasps) for different design looks.

Each of the basic and design skills is covered with a brief but clear series of photos and instructions, and is then followed by three or more beautiful projects.  I just can't think of any better way to introduce these skills than to end up with pretty pieces to wear when you're done.  Great job, Karin!



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Monday, June 15, 2015

The versatile Cellini spiral



Many times when I'm between projects, I will simply pick out some beads and start a beadweaving pattern with them.  I particularly enjoy doing this when I don't have to think about the pattern too much, and can thus allow my mind to wander freely until it hits on whatever the next major project will be.

The best part of this type of wool-gathering?  I usually end up with a piece that I can use sometime down the road!

My most recent "thinking with my hands" session involved stitching up this Cellini spiral tube.  Will it end up being a bracelet?  Part of a necklace?  A sculptural piece?  I don't know yet :-)




If you know how to do tubular even count peyote stitch, you're all set with the Cellini spiral. Make a circle with undulating sized beads in pairs. Tie a knot and reinforce your base by stitching through it again. The rules are simple: For the current row you are stitching, pick up the same bead that you have just exited in the row below. When you get to the end of the row, you will have to step up to start the next row, but that's the only thing that is even remotely tricky about Cellini spiral.




Happy stitching!  And let me know if you have a great idea about what I should do with this piece...it's about 8 inches long.

Copyright 2015 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.

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