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Change is good. But hard.

The only thing constant in life is change   ~ attributed in various forms to Greek thinker Heraclitus of Ephesus I have fought against...

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Mermaid bead embroidered pendant


I fell in love with this mermaid that my friend Sheri Mallery made, and I decided that she would be the centerpiece of my next pendant.  Along with back stitch, I used some varied lengths of stack stitch (similar to fringe, but on the surface rather than the edges) and pearls to go with the seashore theme.  The bezel uses a right angle weave edging, and some "corner" accents that are both taught in my e-book Some Assembly Required

SAR covers making different types of bezels to enhance both regularly shaped and irregularly shaped cabochons, connecting your bead embroidered components with various techniques, unifying your piece with texture, and creating beautiful finishing styles.

Copyright 2019 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.


Thursday, February 21, 2019

A bead embroidery pendant featuring a polymer clay cabochon


I recently bought some of these polymer clay cabochons from Mary Anne Williams Knapp at her online trunk show.  The colors are wonderful and there's a lot of depth to the designs, even though they are flat rather than domed.  I didn't mind the lack of doming at all...in fact, it allowed me to add fewer rows of peyote in order to get to the top of the cab.  Once there, I decided to fool around a bit with a decorative flourish.  Do you like it?  It's simply some additional peyote done with size 15/0 seed beads.  I'm planning on playing with this idea more and getting more elaborate, but on a plainer cabochon!


If you've never added fringe to your pieces, it's really easy.  I show you how to do it with over-sized beads and lots of pictures in the free first chapter of my e-book Every Bead Has a Story.

Copyright 2019 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.


Monday, February 18, 2019

Copper tusk bead embroidered pendant


The centerpiece of this pendant is a copper clay beauty that I bought from Jennifer West.  I have FIVE more of her pieces, so the metallic fun will continue! I'm planning on doing some more elaborate bezeling on some of the other pieces. 


Step-by-step instructions for putting together a bead embroidered piece, including back stitch, edging brick stitch, and stack stitch can be found in the free first chapter of my e-book Every Bead Has a Story.  Chapter two has instructions for stitching a peyote stitch bezel, and Chapter three teaches the square stitch bail.  Additional chapters focus on altered surfaces, dimensional beading, found objects and unusual materials, and integrating bead embroidery with other fiber arts.


Copyright 2019 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.


Thursday, February 14, 2019

Turquoise bead embroidered pendant


This is the second painted glass cabochon that I bought from my friend Lea Avroch.  I highly recommend her work if you are looking for one-of-a-kind pieces to use in your bead embroidery, and no, she didn't pay me to say that :-)  I have some leather and leather-look necklaces on the way to use as neck straps for some of these pendants that I've been making.  I think I'm going to look into selling some of them, because they are starting to pile up!


Step-by-step instructions for putting together a bead embroidered piece, including back stitch, edging brick stitch, and stack stitch can be found in the free first chapter of my e-book Every Bead Has a Story.  Chapter two has instructions for stitching a peyote stitch bezel, and Chapter three teaches the square stitch bail.  Additional chapters focus on altered surfaces, dimensional beading, found objects and unusual materials, and integrating bead embroidery with other fiber arts.

Copyright 2019 Cyndi Lavin. All rights reserved. Not to be reprinted, resold, or redistributed for profit. May be printed out for personal use or distributed electronically provided that entire file, including this notice, remains intact.


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